Georgia Employment, Education, Civil Rights, Injury And Wrongful Death Lawyers

Williams Oinonen LLC helps protect the rights of our clients who have been injured or harmed due to a wrong or injustice. We specialize in employment law, education, civil rights, business disputes, injury & wrongful death. We fight to protect our clients' best interests and help them obtain the justice they deserve. Williams Oinonen LLC cares about each of our clients. The respect and aggressive advocacy we provide reflects the commitment we bring to winning their case.

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The Charlton County Herald recently featured Dr. Green’s victory in winning her Open Records Act at trial see here for the news story.  

The citations below refer to “T” stand for the trial transcript which can be made available upon request:

Dr. Green contends the school district’s motive to withhold Open Records is to cover up systemic discrimination within the District. Evidence of discrimination is replete in the record and includes the following: For the past 136 years of Charlton County School District’s existence, a Black woman has never been hired as a school Principal or Superintendent despite being the District being approximately one-third African American in demographic. (T-197:1-9; T-426:7-16.) The current Chairman of the Board of Education Matt Sands testified that he did not think its problematic that in the 136 years of public-school existence there has never been a Black female that has been hired as a school principal (T-426:9-25; 427:1-11) stating “it’s just the fact that that’s the way it is.” (T-426:13-14.)

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The link to the 2022 issue of Super Lawyers 2022 can be found here.

For a eighth year in a row, Julie Oinonen, Managing Partner of Williams Oinonen LLC, was an Honoree for her work in the Georgia legal community this 2022 year and named as a Georgia 2022 Super Lawyer. Only 5 percent of the lawyers in each state are named to Super Lawyers each year.

Ms. Oinonen’s practice encompasses all plaintiff’s side work including wrongful death, employment, civil rights, education, personal injury and business litigation matters. She is an active board member of National Employment Lawyer’s Association of Georgia, a civil rights organization made up of Employment Litigation lawyers who advocate for employee rights. A proud Emory Law alumna, she is on the Alumni Board of Emory Law School, an Executive Committee member of the Emory Inn of Court, and is a faculty instructor at Emory University School of Law’s Trial Techniques program.

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A race discrimination case’s new developments were featured on the six o’clock evening news. For more information, you can view this breaking news story here. Ms. Oinonen was quoted stating:

“Race discrimination is a systemic issue facing African American educators all over Georgia who are being subjected to overt and explicit discrimination. In Dr. Madison’s case, he was threatened with lynching and was told that Board members were coming after his job after he spoke out against racial injustice in a positive affirming way. This is illegal for any employer to do against anyone, regardless of their race. Title VII Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employers from discriminating and retaliating against those who speak out against discrimination.

The reality is that Dr. Madison was a well-loved educator who nobly served the school district for decades. He graduated from his hometown school district as a star football athlete and successfully worked his way up to school principal. In fact, a petition signed by numerous educators and employees who worked at that school was submitted to the administration in support of Dr. Madison. It wasn’t until he spoke out against racism that he first encountered retaliation by the District. And that is an illegal violation of the Title VII Civil Rights Act of 1964 which prohibits employers from discriminating and retaliating against workers in Georgia.

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Dr. William Leamon Madison alleged race discrimination and retaliation in a lawsuit filed by Williams Oinonen LLC, which was featured on the news here and here and here and here and here and here.

Dr. Madison, former Principal at Colquitt County Schools is alleging race discrimination and retaliation having lost his job after he spoke out against racial injustice in an email to his staff shortly after the murder of George Floyd. The EEOC is concurrently investigating this matter.

Dr. Madison was a hometown hero in Colquitt County, graduating as a star football athlete, then working his way up for nearly two decades from a paraprofessional all the way to Principal. For the past 17 years of his entire career, Dr. Madison received good performance evaluations. All of that changed after Dr. Madison sent an email to his teachers and staff Cox Elementary after the murder of George Floyd. In his email, Dr. Madison encouraged the staff to be supportive of students, as well as speaking out against racial injustice in a positive affirming way. The superintendent summoned Dr. Madison to his office. The superintendent informed Dr. Madison that several school board members were upset at his email and called for his job. Emboldened, a teacher told Dr. Madison, “We’re going to lynch you.” Dr. Madison reported this hate crime to the central office only to be told he could write the teacher up. Three days later, the board decided to terminate Dr. Madison’s employment in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 in addition to other federal civil rights laws prohibiting race discrimination and retaliation.

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Check out Atlanta Women’s Magazine this month’s feature article.

Ms. Oinonen was asked by Atlanta Women’s Magazine: “Which woman inspires you and why?” to which she responded:

“Women lawyers who have gone into public service in either the executive, legislative, or judicial branches have inspired me. People like Hillary Clinton, Kamala Harris, and Ruth Bader Ginsberg to name just a few….I think the trick is finding the good in others that you can seek to emulate while learning to avoid shortcomings and mistakes. All of us have good/bad, strength/weaknesses and we can all learn from each other… the women that are a part of our law firm are an incredible inspiration to me. I am grateful to have the opportunity to work with Esther, Muna, Michele, and Chanel. We all make a great team.”

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After an intense three day OSAH hearing before the Administrative Law Judge, Good Georgia Education Lawyer obtained a win for educators in a PSC (Georgia Professional Standards Commission case) that was prosecuted by the Attorney General for the State of Georgia.

In the ALJ’s decision which can be read here, the Court completely reversed the Georgia Professional Standards Commission to revoke the educator’s license certification.

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For a seventh year in a row, Julie Oinonen, Managing Partner of Williams Oinonen LLC, was an Honoree for her work in the Georgia legal community this 2021 year and named as a Georgia 2021 Super Lawyer. Only 5 percent of the lawyers in each state are named to Super Lawyers each year. To read this year’s Georgia Super Lawyer 2021 magazine see here.

Ms. Oinonen’s practice encompasses all plaintiff’s side work including employment, civil rights, education, personal injury and business litigation matters. She is an active board member of National Employment Lawyer’s Association of Georgia, a civil rights organization made up of Employment Litigation lawyers who advocate for employee rights. Her cases involve civil rights, employment, and wrongful death/serious injury claims. A proud Emory Law alumna, she is on the Alumni Board of Emory Law School, an Executive Committee member of the Emory Inn of Court, and is a faculty instructor at Emory University School of Law’s Trial Techniques program.

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Williams Oinonen LLC had the privilege of representing Dr. Lana Foster in several race discrimination and employment matters. Her case was settled with the EEOC and in addition to the monetary settlement, requires her former employer to establish a recruitment plan for increasing the number of qualified Black applicants, to create a hiring and recruitment procedure that will incorporate nondiscriminatory hiring practices, and to institute professional training relating to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Said Dr. Foster: “I couldn’t let a day go by without thanking God for what you have done for my family and me! Thank you for giving me the best gifts ever–my name back, my livelihood, my self respect, the five lawsuit wins, and my life along with a bonus price tag. No amount of money could ever replace what you have done for me! For your brilliant attorney skills, services, dedictation I am forever grateful and in debt! Thank you for believing in me and fighting my battle! My prayer for you is for God to continually “Bless” you and your family forever. Thank you for being my lawyer as well as my friend! Please let your husband know he has a true “Gem diamond” that God has truly blessed this world with and that is YOU! Forever Grateful, Lana Foster.”

For more information on the lawsuit, see here. If you have been subject to race discrimination, do not hesitate to contact our law firm today at 404-654-0288.

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A long, hard battle to protect the rights of an educator falsely charged with wrongdoing at Clayton County Schools paid off when the tribunal voted to reject the recomendation of the Superintendent’s adverse action against a young teacher who was doing his best to do his job ethically and competently in the face of adversity.

Williams Oinonen LLC is proud to represent hard working educators all around South Georgia, North Georgia and in between. We especially consider it a privilege to represent Georgia Association of Educators members as well as an attorney affiliate. Stated the educator in response to his victory: “Wow!!! You are totally amazing!!! Thank you so much for all of your hard work and expertise.”

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Michael Dashawn Moore was only 19 years old shot and killed during a traffic stop by Mobile Police officer Harry Hurst in 2016 when, according to witnesses, he had his hands up. Officer Hurst claimed he had a weapon which no one could find at the scene.

Williams Oinonen LLC obtained a recent ruling in a case that sparked protests in Mobile, Alabama, in 2016 and continues to generate controversy, where the federal judge has added to a significant body of case law holding that police officers accused of shooting citizens are not automatically protected by the doctrine of qualified immunity, which has so often derailed civil lawsuits seeking damages.

This is a big win in the case for obtaining justice for our client, Michael Moore’s family. For more information you can read the story here.

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